David Gerzof Richard
Traditional Texting is on the Decline. My thoughts on this trend are shared in this interview with NPR's All Things Tech.

Traditional Texting is on the Decline. My thoughts on this trend are shared in this interview with NPR's All Things Tech.

My CES 2014 Tech and Gadget Round-Up onFOX News

Interesting data on where Emerson College alums live, work and what they do - provided by the new LinkedIn University Pages.

Interesting data on where Emerson College alums live, work and what they do - provided by the new LinkedIn University Pages.

My thoughts on LinkedIn University Pages shared with the Fox News team. I’m really excited to see where this goes.

Last Week LinkedIn sent out emails congratulating users for having their online resume be a top 10%, 5% or 1% visited profile.  This was a brilliant social marketing move by LinkedIn as not only did they share this information with the top 10% of their user base – that’s 20 million people by the way; LinkedIn also provided simple links for people to share this “exclusive” status on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn, which a lot of people did. If you were living under a rock and thought the platform was irrelevant, LinkedIn just had their top 20 million users by view, tell you otherwise. That’s called Buzz. Nice job LinkedIn. Here’s a FOX News bit I did on LinkedIn’s viral marketing.

A few Massachusetts companies that launched some very cool products at #2013CES this year are shared with FOX 25 Boston.

The list of companies and their products are below.

iRobot: Mirra Bedford, MA Submersible pool cleaning robot - Known for the Roomba, this is a Roomba for your pool. Super easy to use - dual top load canisters for easy debris removal with fine filters Bypasses traditional pool pumps so it saves on energy and money and covers the entire pool, including the waterline
Available this Spring iRobot.com for $1299

E-Ink and Central Standard Timing: CST-1 Cambridge, MA World’s Thinnest Watch Weighs about 10 grams, so about the weight of a quarter Available at: Kickstarter.com $129.00

Nuance: Dragon Mobile Assistant Burlington, MA We all know about Siri on the iPhone, this is Siri for your Android Phone. Speak to send texts, Search contacts or for a restaurant - Available now and it’s FREE in the Google Play Store

OnGuard: Vertex Waltham, MA Integrated Origami Stand Available at: Onguardprotector.com iPad version is $49.99

Lilliputian Systems: Nectar Wilmington, MA Portable power device that can power all your devices for 2 weeks up to a month on a single power pod. Recyclable Power Pods mean that you could never have to plug into an outlet. Nectar will be available at Brookstone this Summer and will retail for $299.99. Nectar Pod cartridges will retail for $9.99 each.

My High Level Discussion of How Obama and Romney used Social Media in Election 2012 on Fox News

A Discussion of Social Media & Election 2012 on Fox News looking at sentiment on Twitter and Facebook as well as top election memes for 2012.

Apple’s iPad Mini Announcement, Well Marketed

 A quick take on Apple’s iPad mini announcement going into the holiday marketing season and entering the 7 inch tablet market shared with our friends at FOX morning news.

If you live in the Boston area, you don’t need to be reminded – the Red Sox were pretty underwhelming this year. MLB playoff season is in full swing, and sadly the Red Sox are not a part of it. But like any true Bostonian, the BIGfish team still made it out to a game this year. And in the midst of peanuts, beer, and baseball, our marketing minds couldn’t help but wonder: has the Green Monster always been a massive wall of advertisements? We decided to do some research on the famous wall that has become a landmark at Fenway Park.

A quick search online told us that the Green Monster wasn’t always green–in fact, the original wall was plastered with advertisements. Built in 1912 as a part of the original ballpark, it was known simply as “the Wall” and was made of wood. In 1934 the wooden wall was covered in tin and concrete, but the advertisements remained. It actually wasn’t until 1947 that the advertisements were removed and the wall was painted the classic green color it is today.

Believe it or not, starting in 1947 the only signage allowed in the park for more than 20 years was a billboard in right field promoting the Jimmy Fund, an official team charity benefiting cancer research.

In the late 1960s brands began advertising within Fenway Park once again, but it wasn’t until the new millennium that advertisements returned to what’s now known as the Green Monster. Since then, Fenway Park has slowly populated the legendary wall with advertisements.

We put together the slideshow below to illustrate the gradual appearance of advertisements on the Green Monster over the past 12 years. Click through to see the transformation.

As you can see, in 2000, there wasn’t a single ad on the Green Monster; the ever-present Citgo sign remained visible behind the wall, but no ads were actually on it.

In 2001 and 2002, an innocent Boston Red Sox logo was painted above the scoreboard. Barely noticeable.

Cut to 2003. This was the year that 269 seats were installed on top of the Green Monster, giving ticketholders a unique perspective of the field. Along with those new seats came two new logos: billboards sprouting from the Green Monster advertising Sports Authority and Volvo.

Since then, the Green Monster has gradually added more and more signage to its green canvas. Click through the slideshow to see the changes. Today, we can spot 12 brands on the famous Fenway landmark.

Have any of you diehard Red Sox fans noticed this gradual change to the Green Monster? Do you think it cheapens the legendary wall, or are advertisements the norm at ballparks these days? We just hope Fenway doesn’t become known as “Volvo Park” one day…

Facebook Promoted Posts

In a recent Fox News appearance I was asked to share my thoughts on Facebook’s new promoted posts. To start I think this is a bad idea - it takes away the “random” democracy of posts impressions based on content and likes and replaces it with a pay for post system. This fundamentally changes Facebook’s level playing field and hands the keys for post impressions to people who can afford to spend $7 bucks each time they post. This could be seen as a step towards elitest or upperclass social sharing. I understand Facebook needs to start pulling in serious revenue, but why not by creating a premium Facebook experience similar to the the model that LinkedIn uses?

This morning I took a cursory look at the deal sites and apps available through digital and social media platforms and realized there is no standards based deal system that retailers use. This means that marketers need to diversify their spread of digital deals to constantly experiment with what works best. It also means that consumers can find deals and coupons for their favorite brands in multiple places like Groupon, brand apps, check-in apps, deal sites, Living Social, etc. The real winners in this space right now are super savvy, deal-focused consumers who have learned to check multiple sites and platforms for deals before they buy.  If you want to learn more, watch my FOX News interview above.

I recently spoke with CBS News (see video) on email marketing, specifically is it growing? Dying? Making a comeback? CBS was investigating the notion that social media marketing has eaten away at email marketing. This is definitely not the case. While social media marketing is most certainly on the rise, it’s complementing email marketing campaigns as additional outlets for calls to action and discussion that can start with an email campaign. 

The fact is email marketing never went away. Sure there’s a ton of attention paid to social media marketing, but it’s a $1.5 billion dollar a year industry that is still growing and is firmly established as a vital tool in any marketer’s arsenal. 

From an ROI perspective email marketing earns advertisers $43 for every $1 invested, while print advertising earns only $3 for every $1 spent. Email is quick to send, easy to track, a cinch to deliver, and can be personalized to age group, interest, location, you name it. Nearly 90% of marketers find email campaigns effective, identifying email as one of their top three advertising methods.

Email marketing is most certainly a growing industry and is expected to reach $2.5 billion in the US by 2016. Nearly 70% of companies have increased their budgets for email marketing in 2012, finding email cheaper, easier and more effective than other methods.  For small businesses especially, email marketing is essential: over 50% of small business use it. 

With over 90% of US Internet users also using email, email marketing is a great platform for communicating a brand’s message or a company’s product. 

I recently had the pleasure of chatting with Boston Herald technology reporter, Jessica Van Sack on the NFL installing WiFi in the Patriots’ home field: Gillette Stadium. The big question was why? What reason could the NFL have for outfitting fans with WiFi? I suddenly remembered my last excursion to Fenway Park; the Yankees were in town and things did not end well for the Sox. It also didn’t end well for trying to use FaceBook’s mobile app on my iPhone. With 37,400 fans all trying to check in and upload photos and videos at the same time, they managed to cannibalize the majority of cellular data available during the entire game, leading me to eventually give up on uploading anything.
The Consumer Electronics Show, CES, in Las Vegas is even worse for mobile data plans. Imagine over 150,000 technology enthusiasts packed into one square mile, armed to the teeth with the latest smart phones, e-readers, tablets and laptops, all trying to beat out the next guy to be the first to upload a photo or video of never-before-seen gadgetry. Good luck with that.
This is the first year that the US population has seen greater than 50% penetration in smart phone adoption. This means that at least 50% of the 70,000 Patriots fans who swarm Gillette Stadium each Sunday this fall will be smart phone enabled, making them mobile content creators. The average time of an NFL football game is slightly over three hours, fans probably arrive at their seats a half hour to an hour early, but the game itself, in-terms of actually playing time, is one hour split into 15 minute quarters. This means there’s over an hour of down time where 35,000 plus fans can update and upload content over the free WiFi network and you can bet that that content is NFL and Patriots related. Sounds to me that the NFL and Patriots are the real winners here.
Here’s a link to Jessica Van Sack’s Boston Herald Article: Gillette Wi-Fi gives fans something to tweet about that contains a few quotes from our interview.

I recently had the pleasure of chatting with Boston Herald technology reporter, Jessica Van Sack on the NFL installing WiFi in the Patriots’ home field: Gillette Stadium. The big question was why? What reason could the NFL have for outfitting fans with WiFi? I suddenly remembered my last excursion to Fenway Park; the Yankees were in town and things did not end well for the Sox. It also didn’t end well for trying to use FaceBook’s mobile app on my iPhone. With 37,400 fans all trying to check in and upload photos and videos at the same time, they managed to cannibalize the majority of cellular data available during the entire game, leading me to eventually give up on uploading anything.

The Consumer Electronics Show, CES, in Las Vegas is even worse for mobile data plans. Imagine over 150,000 technology enthusiasts packed into one square mile, armed to the teeth with the latest smart phones, e-readers, tablets and laptops, all trying to beat out the next guy to be the first to upload a photo or video of never-before-seen gadgetry. Good luck with that.

This is the first year that the US population has seen greater than 50% penetration in smart phone adoption. This means that at least 50% of the 70,000 Patriots fans who swarm Gillette Stadium each Sunday this fall will be smart phone enabled, making them mobile content creators. The average time of an NFL football game is slightly over three hours, fans probably arrive at their seats a half hour to an hour early, but the game itself, in-terms of actually playing time, is one hour split into 15 minute quarters. This means there’s over an hour of down time where 35,000 plus fans can update and upload content over the free WiFi network and you can bet that that content is NFL and Patriots related. Sounds to me that the NFL and Patriots are the real winners here.

Here’s a link to Jessica Van Sack’s Boston Herald Article: Gillette Wi-Fi gives fans something to tweet about that contains a few quotes from our interview.